Flat Classroom Conference – Beijing 2011

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Well, what a weekend we had. Yes, another one! Following on from my adventures in Shanghai the week before with ISCMS (see previous post), I attended the Flat Classroom Conference Beijing 2011 which was hosted by my school, Beijing BISS International School. A great achievement, particularly for my friend and colleague, Julie Lindsay who is one of the founders of the ‘Flat Classroom’ movement alongside her co-founder Vicki Davis. Congratulations too, to Kim Kofino for her great presentations and ‘presence’ at the conference.

We saw many smiling faces of kids from all over the world – which surely was the measure of the success of the conference. For some of the students, this trip to Beijing was the first time they had left their home countries and all feedback from the young participants was positive. I must also take my hat off to BISS for doing a great job hosting the delegates. As my wife Penny says, ‘BISS punches above its weight!’ yet again.

The idea is simple, really. Flatten the walls surrounding the classroom (metaphorically speaking) – in other words, lose the barriers to communication and collaboration. The world really is becoming flat (maybe Galileo got it wrong!).

Check out the hash tag #flatclass2011 on Twitter to see many interesting tweets packed with useful links from the conference.

Highlights for me were sharing ideas and skills with friends from all over the world. I loved the sessions on Visual Literacy (basic film-making) run by Frank Guttler who describes himself as a ‘film/video educator’. He gave us so much technical information which will be useful in the future and his manner was easy-going and patient with video novices like me. I also enjoyed being reminded of digital tools such as QR Codes – look out for them appearing all over BISS soon! Many thanks to the dozen or so students who each presented a different useful digital tool to us on the last morning .

I was less impressed with the sessions on Instructional Design, which for me and possibly many of the young people were too burdened with edu-speak and procedure. The fundamental ideas seemed good, but I believe the intention of making ‘instruction’ easier to implement, ironically, backfired in this particular example of ‘instruction’. By breaking all the steps of planning down and giving them a name (and the inevitable acronym), I believe, people’s creativity in designing their projects in a short timeframe (a weekend conference) was hindered by confusing templates and instructions. Perhaps the groups who were brainstorming some great ideas, might have had better results if just left alone to create and encouraged more at the end of the process. Just my opinion, of course. The other thing I did not enjoy, was having our project design ‘assessed’ and given a ranking against other ‘entries’. A poorly-conceived rubric was applied to our work, which we had not been given until after the task was finished. Also, I felt that the elements being assessed were not particularly relevant in judging whether a project concept was worthwhile or likely to be implemented. We as educators should be careful to apply meaningful assessment – especially to fellow teachers! Check out my group’s idea for a collaborative project called LIPS (Local Issues People Share). Who knows, we might just do it!

Congratulations to all involved with a terrific Flat Classroom Conference – especially to Julie, Vicki, Kim and all those great students! Kudos to you all.